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 Post subject: books you read / books read / put on the shelf to look smart
PostPosted: April 10th, 2011, 6:32 pm 
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Lot of clever chaps around here so I'd love to hear about reading lists.

In progress:

Zero History, William Gibson (halfway through, I just keep forgetting to bring it on plane trips)
A Bridge Too Far, Cornelius Ryan (absorbing and meticulous)
2666, Roberto Bolaño (stalled out for months)
Kristin Lavransdatter, Sigrid Undset (also long stalled yet deeply, deeply engaging)
With the Old Breed, Eugene Sledge (I think my dad stole this one)

Recently completed:
Interactive Storytelling, Chris Crawford (helpfully recommended by orikae)
Odysseus in America, Jonathan Shay

Most of my reading tends toward either military history/personal accounts of war, for both personal interest and in research efforts to get at game representations that aren't necessarily realistic but also not variations on the highly abstract/stylized established genre patterns. I also enjoy pulp and detective fiction, occasional harder SF, and Cormac McCarthy.

If you want to talk about an inspired bit of reading list keeping, Art Garfunkel has kept meticulous track of his reading list for a very, very long time. Worth a look.

So what are you reading/what have you read/what are you going to read? What are your highest recommendations at the moment?


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 Post subject: Re: books you read / books read / put on the shelf to look s
PostPosted: April 10th, 2011, 7:17 pm 
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I have a copy of Charles Dickens' David Copperfield. English is not my first language, but I usually have little trouble reading it. Not this; there were paragraphs, sentences and even parts of sentences I had to read several times just to understand what they meant. It was just too much for me and I simply gave up.
But I did really enjoy what I did get through and wish I hadn't stopped reading. And now I can't find it.
I also have War and Peace somewhere, but I made even less headway there. I know where it is though...

Hamlet on the Holodeck is probably the only non-fiction book that I've read (outside of school) and enjoyed enough to finish. Very enjoyable and enlightening, highly recommend it.

At the moment I'm reading The Art of Game Design by Jesse Schell. I bought it a while ago and have been avoiding reading it because I saw a talk given by Schell that did not sit well with me. Gave in eventually though. Only read a couple of chapters but it's making more sense than I thought it would.


Last edited by OldSoulCyborg on April 10th, 2011, 7:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: books you read / books read / put on the shelf to look s
PostPosted: April 10th, 2011, 7:20 pm 
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Phoo.

Caveat: I'm currently doing an MA in English Literature. I read a lot.

* = recommended
** = highly recommended

Read in the last six months for school:
  • Slavoj Zizek - Living in the End Times*
  • Naomi Klein - The Shock Doctrine*
  • Barack Obama - Dreams From My Father
  • Bethany Moreton - To Serve God and Wal-Mart
  • Sarah Thornton - Seven Days in the Art World
  • Michel Foucault - History of Sexuality Part 1
  • Giorgio Agamben - Homo Sacer
  • Mary Shelley - Frankenstein (critical edition)*
  • Karl Marx - Capital
  • John Cleland - Fanny Hill
  • Julia Kristeva - Powers of Horror
  • DH Lawrence - Lady Chatterley's Lover
  • Radclyffe Hall - Well of Loneliness
  • Suburban Souls
  • Henry Miller - Tropic of Cancer
  • Vladimir Nabokov - Lolita***

Game Design:
  • Ernest Adams - Fundamentals of Game Design, 2nd ed**
  • Raph Koster - A Theory of Fun in Game Design
  • Jesse Schell - The Art of Game Design: A Theory of Lenses**
  • Tom Bissell - Extra Lives**
  • Chris Crawford on Interactive Storytelling
  • Janet Murray - Hamlet on the Holodeck
  • First Person (assorted authors)
  • Second Person (assorted authors)
  • Katie Salen and Eric Zimmerman - Rules of Play* (stalled)
  • Katie Salen and Eric Zimmerman - The Game Design Reader* (stalled)

Currently reading:
  • Jesse Schell - The Art of Game Design: A Theory of Lenses (rereading)
  • Raymond Chandler - The High Window**
  • Jane McGonigal - Reality is Broken (ugh)
  • Donald Norman - The Design of Everyday Things**
  • Donald Norman - Emotional Design*
  • Donald Norman - The Design of Future Things*
  • Oscar Wilde (probably misattributed) - Teleny (rereading)
  • David Kushner - Masters of Doom
  • Aaron Reed - Writing Interactive Fiction with Inform 7*
  • The IF Theory Reader (various authors)


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 Post subject: Re: books you read / books read / put on the shelf to look s
PostPosted: April 11th, 2011, 2:47 am 
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I devoured the bulk of Terry Pratchett's discworld stuff in my formative years (I've since grown out of them, but I highly recommend "Feet of Clay" and "Small Gods"). Not particularly high art, but I'm pretty sure it helped shape my slightly obscure and sardonic sense of humour.

In uni I read a bunch of Russian literature, but not really out of choice. Ones that stuck out were Mы (My or "We") - which is like 1984, except it predates both Orwell and Brave New World - The Master & Margarita and... umm... one chapter of the Brothers Karamazov.

I just finished Hemingway's For Whom the Bell Tolls and The Dubliners by Joyce (his adaptation of Ulysses is currently judging me from the shelf for still not reading it). Leafing through Huckleberry Finn currently to make up for the fact that I was never made to read it in school.

I enjoy a good biography every now and again. At risk of sounding like a complete dork, I found former WWF-wrestler Mick Foley's (Mankind, Dude Love, Cactus Jack) autobiography fascinating

http://www.amazon.com/Have-Nice-Day-Blo ... pd_sim_b_3

His tales concerning the Japanese wrestling circuit are particularly gruesome, as is the backstory to the infamous Hell in a Cell moment against The Undertaker in 1998.



[edit: oh and, fuck yeah, Lovecraft]


Last edited by dudeglove on April 11th, 2011, 4:38 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: books you read / books read / put on the shelf to look s
PostPosted: April 11th, 2011, 2:58 am 
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@orikae
Klein, Marx, Foucault, Zizek...A little one-sided surely?
@gauss
WITH THE OLD BREED is a great book. His follow-up, CHINA MARINE, is well worth getting too.
@OldSoulCyborg
Both Dickens and Tolstoy are worth sticking with.

Books I've read in the last month:

Alexander Baron's 'Men, Women & War' trilogy (FROM THE CITY, FROM THE PLOUGH; THERE'S NO HOME; THE HUMAN KIND). Baron was a squaddie in WW2 and these novels/short stories are based on his experiences. The first is a novel about a fictional battalion, depicting the preparations for and fighting in Normandy. The second is is an auto-biographical depiction of a love affair between a Sicilian woman and a British NCO during a break in the fighting there in 1943. The third is a collection of semi-fictional stories depicting the war from beginning to end. All are notable for Baron's subtle understanding of the psychology of the Tommies. Definitely war novels of the first class.

Sebastian Junger, WAR. A decent but lightweight book about US soldiers in the Korengal valley in Afghanistan. Junger mixes it up with a few psychological, biological and technical facts about warfare which will make it interesting to the general reader. A nice counterpoint to his interesting film RESTREPO (itself inferior to the similar Danish film ARMADILLO)

A whole bunch of recent books about the Battle of Normandy:
  • Robin Neillands, THE BATTLE FOR NORMANDY 1944. A useful general history of the Normandy campaign with a few revisionist arguments. Neillands essentially defends Montgomery and the Anglo-Canadians from many of the attacks made on them in the recent historiography.
  • David French, RAISING CHURCHILL'S ARMY. Pretty much what the book title says. It's an interesting book that kicked off a lot of revisionism when it was released back in 2001 but it is looking a little old now.
  • John Buckley, BRITISH ARMOUR IN NORMANDY. Revisionism of the highest order. Buckley argues that the much criticised British armour was actually much more effective than has been claimed and that the German superiority in tanks was less than has been argued.
  • Sean Longden, TO THE VICTOR THE SPOILS. An experience of war book about of 21st Army Group 1944-45. Longden is in amateur (which sometimes shows) and is obviously very beholden to Charles Whiting (even repeating the same stories in different chapters as Whiting was wont to do) but this is a superb and unique book looking at war from the bottom up. Highly recommended if you want to know what WW2 was like for the men on the front line.
  • Kenneth Macksey, BATTLE. An interesting, if flawed, book that fictionalises a real British operation in Normandy. Macksey was a veteran and intended that the book should explain how the British planned, mounted and fought in Normandy. Weirdly it features illustrations.
  • Terry Copp, FIELDS OF FIRE. Hugely revisionist Canadian history. Argues that the Canadians were extremely and consistently effective. He also, unusually, attacks German tactical doctrine, especially their use of immediate counter-attacks, which he argues were wasteful and predictable.
  • Stephen Hart COLOSSAL CRACKS. Argues that Montgomery used a highly appropriate and highly effective operational method.

Also a whole bunch of British war memoirs:
  • Stan Whitehouse, FEAR IS THE FOE. A tough little infantry memoir. As the title suggests, Stan found that fear was a greater enemy than the Germans opposing him. Probably the best British WW2 memoir about the psychological effects of war on the combat soldier.
  • Geoffrey Picot, ACCIDENTAL WARRIOR. Picot commanded a mortar platoon in Normandy before becoming an infantry platoon commander. He (astoundingly) avoided becoming a casualty, despite fighting in the front line from Normandy to Germany. An excellent memoir of low level command with a lot of insight into the dynamics of combat.
  • Vernon Scannell, ARGUMENT OF KINGS. This memoir covers his service through North Africa and in Normandy (where he is wounded) as an infantryman. An odd book, written in the 3rd person (because Scannell saw his younger self as almost a different person), it is especially good on military prison- where Scannell was sent after deserting. Scannell became a noted poet after the war.
  • Clifford Shore, WITH BRITISH SNIPERS TO THE REICH. A period gun nerd book written in 1946 for the NRA. Shore was in the RAF Regiment but subsequently some sniping, earning a badge from the Lovat Scouts. If you're interested in a detailed and knowledgeable book on WW2 small arms then I highly recommend it.
  • Haden Spicer, FIVE MEN ONE LOAF. A very small memoir. Spicer was an infantryman, captured in Normandy, then sent to a prison camp. Very slight but plenty of insight.
  • Kenneth West, AN' IT'S CALLED A TAM-o'-SHANTER. One of the better squaddie memoirs. Covers his experiences as an infantryman throughout 1944 and 1945 with an interval in the middle where he is patched up in hospital after being hit with phosphorous from a smoke bombardment.
  • Robert Woollcombe, LION RAMPANT. A platoon commander in a Scots regiment. Excellent insight into command and the platoon sized battle.
  • R.M. Wingfield, THE ONLY WAY OUT. A motorised infantryman. The book starts as the Normandy campaign ends, with lots of swanning about in the sunshine before becoming very dark. The book ends with him being shelled in the open for hours, with two bullets in his stomach and counter-attacks raging around him. Grim stuff.
  • Sydeny Jary, 18 PLATOON. A classic memoir of commanding an infantry platoon. Jary sounds insufferable and is fascinating. He contradicts a lot of the conventional wisdom.

Giles Foden, LADYSMITH. A dreary post-colonial novel about the siege of Ladysmith in the Boer War. As predictable as any ultra jingoistic Boys Own story it merely reverses the roles. Thus the goodies are Irish Nationalists, Zulus, a homosexual, anti-jingoes etc. Meanwhile anyone of the Establishment (officers, patriots, devout Christians) is fair game and depicted as idiots, hypocrites and bullies. I'd rather read G.A. Henty any day.

Arturo Perez-Reverte, THE DUMAS CLUB. Enjoyable romp with post-modern allusions as an emotionless book hunter tries to solve a pair of mysteries. Nearly every page has a literary reference or joke. If you like adventure fiction and swashbucklers then I recommend.

George R.R. Martin, WILD CARDS. First story was so dreadful that I gave up on it; it was like a goon-whinge from Reddit, only set in the 1960's (even to the extent of the main character being a poorly dressed passive slob who whines about the jock who steals his girl).

Wolfgang Schivelbusch, THREE NEW DEALS. Fascinating historical comparison of FDR's America, Mussolini's Italy and Hitler's Germany.

Right now I'm reading William Philpott's BLOODY VICTORY (AKA THREE ARMIES ON THE SOMME in the US). If you read one book about the First World War the make it this one. It's not an easy read but you simply cannot understand the war without it. I'm also reading Boris Akunin's TURKISH GAMBIT. I'm a huge fan of his Erast Fandorin pastiches. They're great fun. I'm also in the process of finishing off David L. Schalk's WAR AND THE IVORY TOWER, which I ought to read but can't really be bothered to.

Edit: added more information to make this more useful.


Last edited by Cyrus on April 22nd, 2011, 5:00 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: books you read / books read / put on the shelf to look s
PostPosted: April 11th, 2011, 7:35 am 
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what side would that be, cyrus?


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 Post subject: Re: books you read / books read / put on the shelf to look s
PostPosted: April 11th, 2011, 9:04 am 
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orikae wrote:
what side would that be, cyrus?

All the critics/philosophers on your list are of the (extreme) left.


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 Post subject: Re: books you read / books read / put on the shelf to look s
PostPosted: April 11th, 2011, 9:49 am 
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good thing for me it's not a degree in politics, eh?

klein is actually on there as an object of criticism, the others are noted critics/philosophers used for literary criticism and not as a method of cruel political indoctrination

i actually can't think of many conservative literary theorists off the top of my head. i'd speculate as to why, but i don't think i'd be able to resist sweeping generalizations.


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 Post subject: Re: books you read / books read / put on the shelf to look s
PostPosted: April 11th, 2011, 10:03 am 
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orikae wrote:
good thing for me it's not a degree in politics, eh? klein is actually on there as an object of criticism, the others are noted critics/philosophers used for literary criticism and not as a method of cruel political indoctrination. i actually can't think of many conservative literary theorists off the top of my head. i'd speculate as to why, but i don't think i'd be able to resist sweeping generalizations.

It's not an attack, just an observation. I too can't think of many contemporary conservative literary critics, though I can think of quite a few conservative philosophers.


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 Post subject: Re: books you read / books read / put on the shelf to look s
PostPosted: April 11th, 2011, 10:15 am 
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i didn't take it as such - just seemed an odd filter to apply, given the context


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 Post subject: Re: books you read / books read / put on the shelf to look s
PostPosted: April 12th, 2011, 9:10 am 
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Gauss, here's a recommendation for you:

http://www.amazon.com/War-Like-Other-At ... 956&sr=8-1

The best companion to Thucydides I've ever come across. Very, very readable, too. If you like history, you can't do better than this.


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 Post subject: Re: books you read / books read / put on the shelf to look s
PostPosted: April 12th, 2011, 4:50 pm 
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butler: In my experience the further back you go the more deft the hand at the till needs to be in making history feel immediate, so I'll take the recommendation, thanks.

OldSoulCyborg: More like Tale of Two SHITTIES, AM I RIGHT
Really interesting to hear about reading Dickens with English as a second language. Haven't read Copperfield but I did like Tale of Two Cities despite the hustling for word count. If we're talking about that era, personally I can't recommend Dostoyevsky's The Brothers Karamazov enough. Fervid melodrama that just keeps on giving; I think it'd be my desert island book. So long that you forget the beginning by the end but really builds to a great finish (just make sure it's the Pevear/Volokhonsky translation).

Cyrus, orikae: I knew neither of you would disappoint for good recommendations. Great to see your recent reading lists. Unfortunately I tend to read quite a bit less when not traveling but it doesn't take much to get me back into a book. Especially like your war account recommendations, Cyrus.


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 Post subject: Re: books you read / books read / put on the shelf to look s
PostPosted: April 19th, 2011, 6:07 am 
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buff butler wrote:
Gauss, here's a recommendation for you:

http://www.amazon.com/War-Like-Other-At ... 956&sr=8-1

The best companion to Thucydides I've ever come across. Very, very readable, too. If you like history, you can't do better than this.


Man, that's awesome. I've read the History of the Peloponnesian War a couple of times and it's absolute murder, Thucydides is just such a pedant. I've tried to psych myself up to read it again and just can't make myself. Maybe a companion book is the thing.

Books I've been reading in the last couple of weeks:

Philosophy:
Leviathan, Thomas Hobbes
Discourses on Livy, Nicollo Machiavelli
La Morte deArthur, Thomas Malory
The Acts of King Arthur and his Noble Knights, John Steinbeck
Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle

I haven't read any of these straight through, I've just jumped to parts I really like or wanted to think about. Except Leviathan, because the way it's written is just incredibly logical, and the progression from the tiniest elements of the human experience to the workings of the commonwealth are really crucial to understanding it. I've spent a lot more time around chapters 10-14 though because I think that's where a lot of the meat of Hobbes' ideas lie.

Fiction:
I've mostly been reading bad fantasy novels to break up the smart books, but some of the stuff I've read to relax has been really cool. I just started Hemingway's Fiesta: The Sun Also Rises for the 12th time and it's still just as good, although at this point my copy is falling apart. I also really like James Clavell's King Rat. Clavell was a POW in Changi during WW2 and this book is incredibly personal and tragic. He basically invented the airport novel but unlike most of those his books are really engaging, and King Rat is by far the most powerful.

Looking around I have a shitload of books that I put on the shelf just to looks smart. I've read most of them because I really am smart, but I have to admit that my Complete Works of Plato is not there to be read, it's there to remind me that I've got a huge goddamn brain. And my beat up copy of Finnegans Wake is something I bought from a secondhand store and read for a class. There was a better copy but I didn't want to look like a poser who just bought it to have on my shelf. I am well aware that this makes me a poser but at least it isn't obvious to everyone who walks in. I've also got a first edition of In Cold Blood by Truman Capote which I admit I've never even opened. Someday I'll read In Cold Blood but it won't be that copy.


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 Post subject: Re: books you read / books read / put on the shelf to look s
PostPosted: April 19th, 2011, 10:18 am 
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I have gotten into audiobooks more recently, so not much on the shelf. Mostly pulpy dogshit that I would be embarrassed to mention. It keeps my brain busy while I do the more tedious aspects of art production though.

I am reading Darkness at Noon now after someone mentioned it in response to one of my posts here. First third was great, 2nd half was pretty good. In the last third now.

The main books I had for showing off recently were Anathem by Neal Stephenson and now Zero History is out-faced. Zero History is pretty good, although I think not nearly as great as Spook Country.


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 Post subject: Re: books you read / books read / put on the shelf to look s
PostPosted: April 19th, 2011, 2:19 pm 
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As for audiobooks I know I was just telling Orikae about an audiobook version of Lolita read by Jeremy Irons. For such a talented thespian who is perenially slumming through terrible fantasy films, the book's endless humor and verve is eye-openingly crystallized by his delivery. Awesome.

And really good to see your recs Liesmith. I will always come back to Fitzgerald and Hemingway, and they're always worth the revisiting. I think of those two, friends as they were, as kind of yin/yang for masculine role models. And if The Great Gatsby seems like "that book I had to read in high school" I would invite people to read the first page again, the moment when I did so felt very much life changing and reignited a passion for literature some years back.

Also I don't think I read King Rat but i read others of Clavelle's but I know I've read at least... Shogun? At least two of his old timey Japan novels. Impressive breadth. Older brother always had a worn copy of King Rat but I guess I never got around to it somehow.

Funny you'd mention In Cold Blood, I have a crappy paperback I nabbed intending to read but haven't yet. Way to go on a first edition though, damn. I think the editions I like the most are my Raymond Chandler/James M. Cain/Cormac McCarthy Everyman's Library editions from Knopf. Affordable, beautiful, a joy to read. Just a treat to have and enjoy guilt free.

As for my collection of "there to look smart" I would say most of my Charles Taylor books. I read and still deeply appreciate Ethics of Authenticity, which is the most dangerous of philosophy books: hey I read this, it's short, lightly written and reasonably concise! I'll get his other books! (UPS man opens door, shatters my skull with a thousand page tome)


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 Post subject: Re: books you read / books read / put on the shelf to look s
PostPosted: April 19th, 2011, 2:40 pm 
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several tens of copies of mein kampf


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 Post subject: Re: books you read / books read / put on the shelf to look s
PostPosted: April 22nd, 2011, 7:35 pm 
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Book update: I just read "We Can Remember it for you Wholesale and other stories" and it owns, I'm gonna reread all my Philip K Dick books now. Minority Report, Dr. Bloodmoney, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, A Scanner Darkly, whatever I can find in the house. Then I'm gonna go on a good adaptation marathon, which basically just means watching Total Recall and Blade Runner.

also I finished my King Arthur books and started reading Doctor Faustus. I'm trying to write a screenplay about Christopher Marlowe but it's really hard to write screenplays

See you at the party Richter


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 Post subject: Re: books you read / books read / put on the shelf to look s
PostPosted: April 23rd, 2011, 3:44 am 
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Liesmith wrote:
I'm trying to write a screenplay about Christopher Marlowe but it's really hard to write screenplays.

I always return to this: http://scriptshadow.blogspot.com/2010/0 ... cript.html

Update:
  • William Philpott, BLOODY VICTORY/THREE ARMIES ON THE SOMME. The book to read about the First World War. The heart of the book is Bill's explanation of how victory was achieved in the First World War- through the operational art developed by Foch. He is excellent on explaining how WW1 changed Europe in military, social and political terms. A must buy if you're interested in the making of the twentieth century.
  • Leo Kessler, FORCED MARCH. Kessler is the pen name of the historian Charles Whiting. Under the Kessler name he wrote dozens of war books, mostly set in the Second World War. They were hugely popular in Europe in the 1970's with a mix of war, sex, fart jokes and anti-heroes (the protagonists were often SS men). They are also enormous fun. Whiting used ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT as a sort of blueprint, added his own historical knowledge (Whiting himself served in WW2 with the British) and lashings of puerile humour. They are short, pacey books with memorable characters and a bit of a guilty pleasure for me.
  • Ernst Junger, STORM OF STEEL. I'd heard astounding things about this book so it came as something of a disappointment. Junger's memoir of service in the Kaiser's Army on the Western Front is certainly interesting, with the language - almost a pastiche of Germanic romantic-nationalist literature - being unique, but the almost spiritual nature of the book detracts from factual insight. A classic memoir certainly but hardly the best I've read.
  • Fred Majdalany, PATROL. Majdalany served with the British in WW2 and this is his attempt to become the Remarque of the Second World War with a story about a British patrol in the Tunisian campaign (supplemented by flashbacks). It's full of interesting information for the historian but as a novel it never quite grips the reader. Not bad, just not all that interesting.


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 Post subject: Re: books you read / books read / put on the shelf to look s
PostPosted: May 3rd, 2011, 5:48 am 
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haven't been reading as much lately as I should be, (or consuming any type of media besides posting) but right now I'm reading The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood and enjoying it quite a bit.


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 Post subject: Re: books you read / books read / put on the shelf to look s
PostPosted: May 12th, 2011, 12:39 pm 
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Was recommended it here and after Ninjas said he "enjoyed" it (was harrowed by it I guess?) I noticed a copy of Darkness at Noon at a local bookshop and am about a quarter through it. It's pitch black alright.


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 Post subject: Re: books you read / books read / put on the shelf to look s
PostPosted: May 12th, 2011, 4:17 pm 
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New semester means new course texts.
  • Christopher Marlowe - Faustus and Other Plays ed. David Bevington and Eric Rasmussen
  • Four Revenge Tragedies ed. Katherine Eisaman Maus
  • The Prince - Niccolo Machiavelli, George Bull, Anthony Grafton
  • Jane Austen - Mansfield Park
  • Aphra Behn - The Rover and Other Plays
  • Frances Burney - Evelina
  • Margaret Cavindish - Bell in Campo
  • Jane Collier - An Essay on the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting
  • Eliza Haywood - Selected Fiction and Drama of Eliza Haywood
  • Charlotte Lennox - The Female Quixote
  • Wylie Sypher - Comedy

plus assorted secondary readings. gonna be a hard semester to do anything that isn't reading


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 Post subject: Re: books you read / books read / put on the shelf to look s
PostPosted: May 12th, 2011, 6:57 pm 
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orikae wrote:
New semester means new course texts.
  • Christopher Marlowe - Faustus and Other Plays ed. David Bevington and Eric Rasmussen
  • Four Revenge Tragedies ed. Katherine Eisaman Maus
  • The Prince - Niccolo Machiavelli, George Bull, Anthony Grafton
  • Jane Austen - Mansfield Park
  • Aphra Behn - The Rover and Other Plays
  • Frances Burney - Evelina
  • Margaret Cavindish - Bell in Campo
  • Jane Collier - An Essay on the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting
  • Eliza Haywood - Selected Fiction and Drama of Eliza Haywood
  • Charlotte Lennox - The Female Quixote
  • Wylie Sypher - Comedy

plus assorted secondary readings. gonna be a hard semester to do anything that isn't reading


That booklist has some great stuff on it! The prince is something you can read in a day or two. It's meant to be a handbook. You should read Discourses on Livy if you haven't already, it is a much deeper work and when I read it my understanding of The Prince became so much more nuanced. Dr. Faustus is a bitching play that I've read a bunch of times recently, and like every play ever it takes no time to read. Anything by Jane Austen owns. And wasn't lady Cavendish some kind of bizarro physicist?

I haven't read any of that other stuff but on the strength of what I have you earn the Liesmith Seal Of Approval

As for me, I've started reading the poetry of Lord Wilmot, Earl of Rochester, and GODDAMN is it cool. Super obscene but cool as heck. Also read Hart Crane's The Brooklyn Bridge last night.


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 Post subject: Re: books you read / books read / put on the shelf to look s
PostPosted: May 12th, 2011, 9:21 pm 
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just ordered 8 more copies of mein kampf, almost got my whole bookshelf filled now


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 Post subject: Re: books you read / books read / put on the shelf to look s
PostPosted: May 13th, 2011, 12:45 am 
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pariah dog wrote:
just ordered 8 more copies of mein kampf, almost got my whole bookshelf filled now


So you're like Mel Gibson in that film with Patrick Stewart and all the Catcher in the Rye books.


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 Post subject: Re: books you read / books read / put on the shelf to look s
PostPosted: May 14th, 2011, 1:41 pm 
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Liesmith wrote:
Then I'm gonna go on a good adaptation marathon, which basically just means watching Total Recall and Blade Runner.
Minority Report was a good movie though!


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